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20130101
20130131
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today as knocks well, national, a sell tennessee. and colonel nelson took a group of white settlers and the literally hacked territory out of the woods and fought indians and all that sort of stuff. and in the settlement rachael, his daughter, sort of became the debutante and if you will, the daughter of the most prominent and in the tennessee region. well, from rachael, it's a bit controversial because she does with a proper brought out to do. she, against a parents' wishes runs away and there's an older man who is a ne'er-do-well. his name is louis route are. it appears that he may have been visibly abusive with her. dispenses money. you know, is one thing after another, but he accuses her of all sorts of things. at the least mentally very abusive. so this is a big scandal. then she does with a proper grow back then ought not to do a second time. she leaves some. she leaves him and goes back home. well, a couple things happen. woman legally could not divorce. so she has to ask for the divorce. also, while she's back home, her father and some of her brothers and a lot of the men in
. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cruz of texas. mr. donnelly of indiana. mrs. feinstein of california. mrs. fischer of nebraska. the vice president: please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will
? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: i wonder if i might impose a question to the republican leader if he'd retake the floor. mr. mcconnell: i'd be happy to respond. mr. alexander: i want to congratulate the kwepbl for -- congratulate the republican leader for his remarks, but here is my question: we've arrived at a time when we have a newly elected president who's had a fine inaugural day. he has an agenda that he wants to follow which he announced in his inaugural address. it's not an agenda but most of us on this side agree with, but he has an agenda he wants to follow in the second term, all of which would ensure in his eyes his legacy as a president. but isn't there one thing that in order to get to that agenda or any other thing he and we have to do, and that is to address that red? and isn't the very best time -- isn't the very best time to do something difficult, something nobody wants to talk about, something that's hard, isn't the best time to do that at a time when we have a divided government, a democratic president, a republican house, and 30 or
to do so. i yield the floor. >> madam president? >> the senator from tennessee. >> i wonder if i might post pose a question to the republican leader if he would retake the floor. >> i would be happy to respond. >> i want to congratulate the republican leader for her his remarks but here is my question. we have arrived at a time when we have the newly-elected president who has had a fine inaccurate day. he has an agenda that he wants to follow which he announced in his inaugural address. it's not agenda that most of us on the side i'll agree us but he has an agenda he wants to follow with a second term all of which would ensure his legacy as the president. but isn't there one thing that in order to get that agenda or any other thing he and we have to do and that is to address that and isn't the best time to do something difficult, something nobody wants to talk about, something that's hard and the best time to do that is a time when we have a divided government a democratic president and republican house and 30 or 40 or 50 senators on on both sides who have been saying for two years tha
officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: thank you, madam president. i ask that the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: thank you, madam president. i'm expecting the senator from louisiana, who i had planned to follow. but since he's not here yet, i'll go ahead with my remarks. unless he walks in the door just now, and then he can follow. he can follow me. we're both speaking today about selective enforcement of the law as it relates to the department of justice being willing to enforce the law against certain types of energy producers but not other types of energy producers. senator vitter from louisiana will talk about a letter that he and i will be sending to the attorney general of the united states asking why he does that. i see senator vitter coming in just now, so now that i've give unhim a preamble and a warmup of about two minutes, i think i'll sit do you and listen to what he has to say and then i'll add my comments to his when he finishes. mr. vitter: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. mr.
you, senator alexander. >> thanks, mr. chairman. it looks like just looking at tennessee that maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the funds that are available for mental health and substance abuse through the state government are federal dollars. does that sound about right? is that your experience? most of it goes through two big block grants, one big one and one smaller one. is that about right? >> sort of a rule of thumb somewhere around 1/4 of the funding for the nation. don't know about tennessee in particular but -- >> that sounds about -- about right. >> if you take the medicaid dollars each state has different matches so that changes how much state dollars and how much not. calfs the dollars that go for the mental health of the country as a whole are public dollars, federal and state. >> do you regularly consult with the state mental-health directors about your two block grants and how they are administered and how the money is -- how you might improve the process of applying for that money and make it easier for them to help the people who need help? >> absolutely. we put out a block grant a
. mr. alexander: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: mr. president, i want to thank senator levin for his leadership and senator mccain, senator schumer, cardin, pryor and senator kyl who is now retired from the senate and senator barrasso. we're hopeful that the leaders will be able to recommend to us a set of changes in our rules and procedures and practices that will help the senate operate in a fairer and more efficient way. that's what all of us want. it's surprising how many of us want that. we all worked pretty hard to get here. we all understand we're political accidents. the senator from maine, the senator from arkansas, all of us know that. we're just very fortunate to be here. and while we're here, we'd like to contribute something. and that gets down really to just a couple of things. let's have a committee bill come to the floor, let's make it easy for it to come to the floor, and let us make it easy for senators from the various states and the various points of view to have their say, to offer their amendment, to have it vote
a real small town in east tennessee. and my mom, who raised three kids on her own, didn't have a college education but she just imbued in me this notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? just tell you that every day or how do you feel she made -- >> well, she had very high expectations, and let me know that she expected me to do well in school. but when i would talk to her about, i might work in the white house some day or i'm interested in politics or bag lawyer, she never said -- she said, you'll have to study hard and make good grades because you'll need to get a scholarship because i won't be able to afford it. but she never said, -- the sky's the limit was her view. so i did go to law school, and in the early '80s, when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice, and was going around to law firms, and even at that it point there weren't that many women in the law firm and i had guys who interviewed me sit me down and say, you understand, if you come to the firm you have to try cases, you have to go to court. i said i'm excited about it. a
that he had was this huge technology apparatus, and i went to chattanooga tennessee and i found a company called smart tech. i saw a row for about a year ago in ohio and i asked him about this company. he told me he had never heard of it. well, i find that hard to believe. this is a company that has a history but if you go to all the fronts within fronts and corporate changes and find out who put up the original money, the original money came from two very wealthy republican donors named mercer reynolds and bill dewitt. i research them and in the 80s, they had bailed out george w. bush several times. he had three oil companies in the 80s that went belly-up and each time they came to his rescue. they were also baseball royalty. his father owned the old st. louis browns and they gave bush ownership in the texas rangers which is the only lucrative investment he ever made. he put in $600,000 came away with about $15 million. his company smart tech which started out as part of a legitimate technology company, soon became the republican operation and its all it's all good and well that the repu
tennessee where it's going to be difficult -- [inaudible] my observation to general holder was that if we could somehow take the washington focus off of it and put the solution and resources down to our citizen -- [inaudible] washington is going to come in and take their guns. and i think we who are on the front lines are in a better position to convince our local spaces that these plans can be implemented without this great fear of a washington force coming in and taking their guns. it would also allow the administration to come up with a package in which given senator or senates do not wish to have -- if there are ten items coming out of washington and my senators want six but they don't want four, then they can -- [inaudible] so if we could push it down to the local level, i think we could be much more helpful in getting a package passed. because the fear of taking guns away, speaking for tennessee, it's largely a fear of a national government taking the guns away. they can vote me out of of office quick so they feel that they have more control. so if we could give them power, the loca
. and i did a report for them. >> what is your history? where are you from. >> nashville, tennessee. i group in nashville and my family and relatives are all still there. i went to pearl high school, and i went to howard university. i graduated and went to the university of michigan. >> law school? >> first the history department write got a ph.d. then i went law school. i wanted to do legal history. those days you had to get both degrees. you couldn't get them at the same time. now you can. i had to do one then the other. then . >> did you come north to graduate school on purpose? >> i came to howard, yes, i came on purpose. absolutely. >> why? >> i went to segregated schools in nashville growing up. pearl high was a segregated high from north high negroes as we were called in that day. i went howard and went when i went to michigan i was one of the first students who was black in the ph.d. program. when i got there. the head of graduate studies said to me, he was surprised to see me. i found out what they meant. he told me there was one time a negro came through here years ago. he di
minutes later we went up the gate to mississippi. down the road at some resistance . tennessee highway patrol, up to the state line, saw this big sign, mississippi, welcome to the magnolia state and i was looking around for the mississippi highway patrol. aren't they going to pick us up and take us? well, did not know until six hours later i did not know that they had totally blocked off the performance of their duties, totally left the state of mississippi in further insurrection. made our way down a 2-lane highway, ultimately reported to a general officer, and when you're a second lieutenant he barely show up reporting to a lieutenant-colonel, and here was a general officer with the start scholer. he said to my want you to take a platoon of soldiers down to the lyceum. put out the riots. units have been there already. then go downtown. and did not -- i did not want to ask him anything. you don't say, well, excuse me, sir. may ask you a few questions. you don't do that. you of the executive secretary is looking in all oil and until you're a little bit about your yeah just been given.
to dream big, and he would always say, you know, just because we're undocumented tennessee doesn't mean that we cannot dream. >> host: so what's your relationship with your mother? what was your relationship? >> well, my mother, she was, you know, very good mother up until the point when she took off to come here to the u.s.. when she came here here, her experienced changed her a lot. she did not have a good experience in the u.s.. my father left her for another woman, and when she came back to mexico, she was very bitter and broken hearted about the whole experience, and she changed, too, as a mother. she was no longer interested in being our mother. she was more interested in finding someone to heal her broken heart. i lost my mother when she came here because the woman who came back to me was not the same one. when we lived here with my dad, my mother came back to the u.s., lived a half hour away from us, but i rarely saw her. i was probably see her maybe once a month, maybe twice, but there was a huge distance between us that we were not really able to recover, and it has been, i th
is your history? >> i'm from tennessee. nash fell. my family and their relatives are all still there. i went to a pro high-school. i went to howard university. then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where i got a ph.d. then i went to law school. in those days you had to get both degrees, but you could not get them at the same time. now you can't. now had to do one, then i had to do the other. >> did you come north to graduate school on purpose? >> i came to howard. yes. i came on purpose. i went to segregated schools and national. negros as it were called in those days. that made sense. when i went to michigan i was one of the first to this who was black who was in the ph.d. program because when i got there the head of graduate studies said to me he was surprised to see me. i found out what that meant. he told me, there was one time they came. he did not graduate. so i was sent there by my professors at howard who wanted me to work with a particular professor there. >> who are your parents? >> my parents were poor folk. my father left a surly. one of tho
to mississippi. and down the road, met some resistance. tennessee highway patrol was to the state line, i thought a big sign, welcome to the magnolia state. i was looking around for mississippi highway patrol. they were going to pick us up and take us there. did not know until six hours later that they had totally blocked off their duties, totally left the state of mississippi, further insurrection, cleared the campus. we made our way down a two lane highway, ultimately reported to a general officer and when you are a second lieutenant in the military barely show up reporting to a lieutenant colonel and here was a general officer, a star on each shoulder and he said lt. i want you to take a platoon of soldiers down to the lyceum and put out the rise units that have been there already and go downtown. i didn't want to ask him anything. and chief executive officer giving a low employee and order. you don't say excuse me, may i ask a few questions? you don't do that. you just hope the executive secretary is working out in the hallway and continue a little about the order you have been given. i said
the monthly when she could buy on tra appetizers in restaurants. i am a southerner, i am from tennessee, and i think understanding jefferson in his regional context and national context and political context is important. he was a master of politics, whether it was ideologically driven or geographically driven. there is something president about a ferociously divided atmosphere, big issues at stake, and a president whose tall, cool, sir regrow, pretty good at politics but doesn't like to admit it, having the government in a fractious atmosphere, something seems familiar about that. two quick stories about jefferson to give you two sides of him quickly. matthew davis, an office seeker from new york goes to monticello trying to get an appointment. he would have fit right in, travels to lobby for the job. he was number loyalist, jefferson not so much a blur loyalists. i shad to my hamiltonian friend that at least my guide didn't get shot in managers eat. [laughter] >> of species founders, the most likely to of send mails was alexander hamilton. i want to get that on the record and move on. that y
of california. let freedom ring from georgia. let freedom ring from lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring throughout long-held mississippi. >> let freedom ring. let freedom ring from every state and city. [cheers] [applause] >> he will be able to stand up with all of god's children. black and white and protestant and jewish and all together. [children chanting] [applause] >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear. >> this weekend presidential inauguration as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony at the right house shortly before noon eastern. it begins with a look back at the president's inaugural address in 2009. other inaugural festivities including the capital luncheon in the parade will start at and be covered on monday on c-span. join the conversation on facebook and facebook.com/c-span and on twitter. >> next, scientific and government health officials discussed the economic impact of drought. researchers say that climate change will affect the magnitude and severity of future droughts. this is one hour. >> we now have had two very international
schools. >> host: where was your father? was he from tennessee? >> guest: originally from alabama but he was part of that lot migration that went to detroit in world war i. >> host: our parents generation shows to show their activism against racism by moving, by migrating and our generation use protest. >> guest: historically for most people who come from the peasant background the route to freedom was not a staging a political movement. you moved toward the freer environment of the city. you moved from the south to the north. that is what most people did. in the process of doing that some of them became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism existed in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in a relatively freer environment they are able to create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. there is sncc and the clc and the others. who were the people who most move things? was a king? king? was it malcolm
restaurant and hotel in nashville tennessee and they form -- pour him a cup of coffee and he says this is good to the last drop and before you know it they have a company promoting the coffee and becomes a national brand using teddy roosevelt's slogan. the first and only president to write in advertisement slogan. so i think the next question of course that everyone wants to know is how has our present president obama -- he has yet to really make a mark. he has had a couple of interesting once. shovel-ready is really his. it's hard to find that anywhere. in the first harp he said we have projects that are shovel-ready. snowmaggedon is his. that was a totally spontaneous and monster snowstorm that came through here. he leaves the white house and everything is shut down. he gets to the built in hotel to give an address and he looks out and he says this is snowmaggedon. the other one that is his too in 2011 he used the term sputnik moment. it came up up in his state of the union saying this country needed a challenge, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research a
and returned again and that was something in it. tennessee great degree of calibration as to what you have to absorb or bair that motivates the limited strategy to utilize. another question comes up with selectivity that they distinguished a taliban verse that telegram. it's not just about the target or the insurgent group, the territory being contested. refer to the distinction between settled versus unsettled areas is something that resonates in terms of how pakistan calibrates strategy. unsettled areas are expected to be frontiers, law lists. there's a degree to which militancy or armed militias or the lack of state control to use the term is acceptable. we have a hard time grasping because our concept that they vary in state to the total doesn't exist in most parts of the world. it doesn't exist in india, which is a democratic outlay incapable of stronger states. dispensing with that idea will help to understand what pakistan state to state, with a much more comprehensive strategy to concern about civilian casualties in south waziristan which have been far more limited in scope and str
nashville, tennessee. my family and relatives are also there. and the two pearl high school enemy to howard university, graduated and went to the university of michigan. >> host: law school? >> guest: first the history department and then i went to the law school to do legal history. in those days you had to get those degrees. you can get them at the same time. now you can. i had to do one and then the other. >> host: did you convert to graduate school impervious click >> guest: i came to howard -- yes, i came on purpose. i went to segregated schools in nashville arena. the high school, in those days and i went to howard and that made sense. then i went to michigan, i was one of the first students whose black who is in the phd program because when i got there, said he was surprised to see me and i found out what that man. and then he told me there was one time a came through here years ago, but he didn't graduate is what he told me. so i was sent there by my professors at howard who wanted me to work with a particular professor there in the institution. >> guest: mary frances berry, who are
and light blue. but four of those states, the ones in gray, arkansas, tennessee, virginia, and north carolina, threatened to follow the states of the lower south out the door, unless the newly elected president explicitly abandoned the platform on which he had just been elected. lincoln, they declared, must guarantee that slavery could in the future expand into all or part of the federal territories, and by the way, not only those territories currently held, but also territories yet to be acquired. and that demand was made with an eye on eventually acquiring cuba, parts of central america and other parts of the caribbean, which were expected to be turned into slave-holding territories and slave-holding eventually states. if lincoln did not agree to do this, they said, they would very likely move to join the confederacy as well. well, lincoln and his party refused to these demands and when in april of 1861, the confederacy's bombardment, sparked all-out war, these four upper south states did choose sides. they connect this war between a slave labor confederacy and free labor union was
advance industry initiatives in colorado and tennessee. emily turow co. -- emily derocco run skills training and work for us. prior to that was that the manufacturing institute. prior to the sheep a senior role in the department of labor. finally, the mayor of the great city of louisville, greg fischer who is the background in manufacturing, but for interestingly upon taking office has been working with the mayor of lexington, kentucky on a dual match or welfare come a regional effort on it as manufacturing. but major set some context for the papers we put out yesterday and for the conversation today. first, a very quick reality check. we still think about manufacturing in the united states as yesterday's economy as opposed to the vanguard of innovation in our economy. 9% of the jobs, 11% of gdp, 35% of our engineers, 68% of private-sector r&d, 90% of our patterns. we may be the only mature economy to somehow decouple production and innovation. trust me, germans are doing it, japanese or not contain these are not. some bad news. quinn talked about the great recession, a loss of 8.5
smith of new jersey and diane black of tennessee also addressed the marchers. marking the 40th anniversary of the roe v. wade decision which legalized abortion. [background sounds] [background sounds] >> many streets are closed for the rally and march, which will take marchers to the steps of the supreme court this afternoon. we are covering this event in its entirety life on a website. go to c-span.org. >> tonight at eight we wish we highlight some president obama's second inauguration festivities beginning with the pre-ceremony events. >> you can see all that tonight at 8 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> personal-finance starts as we now in the 1930s with sylvia porter. it's really a spinoff out of the self-help business of the 1930s to the 1930s are known for everything from the hard economic times of the 1930s you see everything from alcoholics anonymous developed in the 1930s to napoleon they can get rich to various personal activist movements. fascism and communism. and there's this fulcrum going on at the. some -- over a period of you. and our goal is to educate people s
the floor. mr. alexander: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: it seems lately i come to the floor when the republican leader is make being reasonable and sensible proposals. i heard him say the same thing last weefnlg iragre week. the president is elected. he deserves credit for that. he now has a chance to define his legacy. es he's told us what that is ins inaugural address. isn't this the right time to get out of the way? hasn't the house of representatives actually given us an unexpected three or four months in which we can do it in so if president obama wants, as i'm sure he must, to begin to work on the other issues that he talked about in his inaugural address -- immigration, for example, these other important issues -- why would we not go work right now as the republican leader says and deal with the runaway, out-of-control entitlement vend d spending that's going to -- spending that's going to bankrupt the program that seniors depend upon to pay their medical bills? we know that's going to a the chair trustees have seder it wil-- have
industry initiatives in colorado and tennessee. emily derocco runs her own firm called e3 which is linking economic development and skills training and workforce. the party that she was at the manufacturing institute. prior to that she played senior role in the department of labor. and, finally, the mayor of the great city of louisville, greg fischer, who actually has a background in manufacturing. it's very interestingly upon taking office has been working with the mayor of lexington, kentucky, on a dual metro effort, a regional effort on advanced manufacturing. let me just set some context of the papers we put out yesterday, and for the conversation today. first, a very quick reality check. we still think about manufacturing in the united states as yesterdays economy. as opposed to the vanguard of innovation in our economy. 9% of the jobs, 11% of the gdp, 35% of our engineers and 68% of private sector r&d, 90% of our patents. we may be the only mature a company to somehow decouple production in innovation. trust me, the germans are not doing it. the japanese are not doing it, and the chi
anniversary of their rough week. if you've ever been to the civil rights museum in memphis, tennessee, they have these recordings, but this is the president talking with one of the principal faces of segregation at the time, governor ross barnett. the safety of james meredith, the student in question gives him some guy. someone has been killed at this point in the right that is unfolding on the campus. and they are doing an elaborate dance where president kennedy is nonetheless insisting that a couple of things have to happen, and here's is how it unfolds. [laughter] >> what was president kennedy seeking to accomplish? and can you explain this ballet speak back there's so much having adam glad we got to be. you can hear a lot in the tone that you can't always get from reading the transcripts. and in that very important conversation he is asserting the right of the president of the united states to order the governor of mississippi and to restore order in a perilous situation, meredith is in danger of his life. parenthood, james meredith has been inspired to register for the university
sent in that picture, and he's like, oh, doc pell bear tennessee's like that's great, too, i love it. don't show the polar bears, they might go after you. basically, i was trying to reel him in. actually, i have another question about the convention on narcotic drugs -- [laughter] and how do you feel about how coca-cola has access to coca and yet, you know, the indigenous people aren't allowed to have it, etc., etc. i was doing this on a twitter feed that at that point he didn't answer. [laughter] and it's funny, because his avatar, the little -- the twitter page, his avatar was actually like shh, like a secret, you know? [laughter] so i did that just so i could illustrate the entire dialogue afterward as a way of just interfacing with these companies. and i had actually planned to keep knocking on their door asking about this. yeah. >> we have a question here. okay. all right. question here, and i know the woman over there as well. >> hi. thank you so much, this has been really fascinating. i was wondering if you guys could tell us if you could set your ideal, um, policy for the war
restaurant and hotel in nashville, tennessee, and they pour him a cup of coffee, and he says, ah, this is good to the last drop, and before you know it, they're promoting this coffee all over the country, it becomes a national brand using teddy roads svelte's slow began. -- roosevelt's slogan. he may be the first and only president to write an advertising slogan. so i think the next question, of course, that everyone wants to know is how does our present president, president obama, what has he tone that's interesting? he's yet to really make a mark. he's not done -- he's done a couple interesting ones. shovel-ready is really his. it's hard to find that anywhere in the first t.a.r.p., he said we've got projects that are shovel ready. sonoma get done's his. ing he -- that was a totally spontaneous, this was in the 2011, the monster snowstorm that came through here, and he gets, he leaves the white house, and he gets to -- everything's shut down, the whole city's shut down. he gets to a hotel to give an address, and he looks out and says this is snowmageddon. the other one that's hi
democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've been in jail. he won the nobel prize and he's still in jail in selma on the right to vote. and the aids simply told dr. king you've got to say you had a purpose. let's say that you're coming out of jail to me
friend, the senator from tennessee, the honorable lamar alexander. [cheering and applause] mr. president, mr. vice president, ladies and gentlemen, the late alex haley lived his life by these six words, find the good and praise it. today we praise the american tradition of transferring or reaffirming immense power in the inauguration of the president of the united states. we do this in a peaceful orderly way. there is no mob, no cot, no insurrection, this is a moment when millions stop and watch. a moment most of us always will remember. it is a moment that is our most conspicuous and enduring symbol of the american democracy. how remarkable that this has survived for so long in such a complex country when so much power is at stake. this freedom devote to our leaders and the restraint to respect the results. last year at mount vernon, a tour guide told me that our first president, george washington, once posed this question: what is most important, washington asked of this grant experiment? the united states. and then washington answered his own question in this way: not the election of
. any other company, stone and webster, tennessee eastman became involved in wartime construction. all of these understood in the process of rcl enterprises say he's not to construct docks for pearl harbor, for example and prepare military facilities, but also to build ships. kaisers liberty ships a classic example at a time in which it took to build constantly shrink down to fewer and fewer days until by 1942 they could launch a liberty ship every five days if they had to. in fact, there's a great story about a woman it comes to christen one of the liberty ships at the portland art, kaisers here in portland, oregon and she comes out with a champagne bottle in the ship certicom. it started as launched and is sailing into the south. so he comes back to us it's been a minute, lady. there'll be another one along in a few minutes. and not just ship the thing. -- ship hoping. magnesium is essential for aircraft manufacturing, which kaiser became heavily involved in the process. feel manufacturing. kaisers supplied steel for his liberty ships built the most modern steel plant in the world ou
. i actually started off, um, as a lawyer. i'm from a real small town in east tennessee, and my mom who raised three kids on her own didn't have a college education, but she just, you know, imbued in me the notion that i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? did she just tell you that every day? or how did you feel she knew that? >> well, she had very high expectations and let me know that she expected me to do well in school. but when i would talk to her about, gee, i'd love to work in the white house someday, or i'm interested in politics, i'm interested in being a lawyer, she never said -- she said you'll have to study hard, you'll have to make good grades, because you'll need to get a scholarship, because i won't be able to afford it. but she never said, you know, it was the sky's the limit. that really was her view. and it really made me think i could do anything. so i did go to law school, and in the early '80s when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice and was going around to law firms, and even at that point there weren't that many
freedom ring in california. >> [inaudible] let freedom ring from lookout mountain and tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill in mississippi. >> from every mountainside, let freedom ring. stannic and when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring from every village, every hamlet, every state and every city. >> we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men, white men, jews and gentiles, protestants, catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of old negro spiritual. >> free at last! free at last! thank god almighty, we are free at last! [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ with ♪ ♪ we are free, free at last ♪ we are free ♪ free at last ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheering] >> live pictures this afternoon at the lincoln memorial as we continue bringing shots from around the nation's capital on this inaugural weekend. fifth grade students from watkins elementary school on the national mall in washington giving the annual reading of dr. martin luther king i have a dream speech from august of 1963 kuran washington fifth. now to the whit
in tennessee versus garner the course they have to stay fabricated the common law rule that would've allowed police to shoot any fleeing felon. in richards versus wisconsin has the states did not support. here we have half the seats in the country that would not have prevented what went on in this case. thank you very much. >> thank you, council. sir custer, three minutes. >> thank you. everyone agrees the closer a chemical test is taken at the time of driving, the more reliable the evidence of intoxication is, the more reliable the evidence of impairment is. under the response to pressure would be mandated we are going to allow the most reliable evidence to dissipate and degrade over a period of time in favor of admittedly less reliable evidence taken at a later time. that is simply inconsistent with fourth amendment jurisprudence and other destruction of evidence cases. the respondents proposed rule here is completely apart to: unworkable. if there are no further questions. >> thank you, counsel. the cases submitted. >> the greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker. this
-down approach with rigid rules and programs. mayor ron littlefield of chattanooga tennessee said in one of our roundtables that it's important that different regions learn an even par a workable from each other. we can be a clearinghouse of good ideas and share solutions that have worked together as the country. this helps avoid past mistakes, but also provide solid evidence that there is a solution that can work and you can take to your counsels some legislators and voters because it's important that workable solution skip it on the table. we heard over and over again how can our roundtables and scholarly papers, they need to the right talent between business and government created the conservation leadership or airship to evaluate and explore entrepreneurial base solution that can entice everybody, conservatives, liberals, rastafarians, never can be here, but the shared goal of conserving our environment. at the roundtable, we heard first-hand from secretary of natural resources about how the challenges are having today trying to manage public lands with dwindling public funding and rigid fe
to indeed take place, it would end at tennessee-year deadlock with repeated failed attempts in reforming the system. most notably, the failure of 2006, and 2007. -- the failures has been deep skepticism shared by many analysts, some advocates, and significant portion of the u.s. population about the ability and will of the u.s. government to enforce the law. .. >> a commitment to the head and its enforcement efforts as the u.s. has had. the reach that spans from local courtrooms and jails, all the way to the ability of would-be travelers to the united states to actually be able to travel to the united states. including to really get to come to the united states. an extension of u.s. borders well beyond the physical borders of the united states. >> this is not the first time that the migration policy institute has really delved deeply into enforcement issues. i think that we are deeply believe that immigration enforcement is key to the immigration enforcement integrity and to the inability of the government to do the smart things they must do in order to take advantage of the opportunitie
mission. honda said tennessee temporary agency and all possibility around after 20 for team troop drawdown because it just that the amount of funds obligated service should be there. sigar is the only agency that given the authority empowered by congress to look at projects across government line. we are not limited like the estate or state or dod for dod. we are specifically instruct it by congress to look across the government. if you do reconstruction in the chemist and, we can look at that program. we also have unique hiring authority and assets are tehran who works for me works that will. so i can hire and also also remove the leaves based upon specific needs and meet requirements. all of our employees have to sign up for the possibility of working in afghanistan. so it is a unique brain. we have as a result the single largest oversight present in any government agency in afghanistan. we are approximately 60 people on the ground right now, including the largest cadre of investigators, within any eight year vi. but it's not just their size and mandate or unique authorities that is impo
in the world right now, morris and knudsen. and the other companies, stone and webster, tennessee eastman who became involved in wartime construction. all of these understand the process of the large-scale enterprise, which they used not just to construct a box to repair pearl harbor, for example, and to prepare -- repair military facility but also to build ships. kaisers liberty ship being the classic example of that. at the time in which it took to build, constantly shrank out constantly shrank out of fewer constantly shrank out a few a few days and do finally by 1942, they could launch a liberty ship every five days. if they had to. there's a great story about a lady who comes out to chris and one of the liberty ships at the portland yard, kaisers yard up in portland, oregon, and she comes out with a champagne bottle and the ship is already gone. it's already been launched and is already sailing merrily into the soh.
turn ownership communities into a tennessee -- tenant communities. then that benefit will rise not to the existing homeowners but to the aggregate. i will stop. >> give tom a chance. >> now that you can see i am truly the wizard manipulating the outstanding mortgage market. it is me. far -- fair market value. with eminent domain he says it is developed by the cities but now one city has developed in the.domain program when you hear from sandy know was devised by mrp it is called joint powers authority. like you have the joint powers authority? a simple answer is they need to create a special purpose vehicle. in with this quick take to take the mortgage and decide how much to pay later. with the analysis you only pay between 70 and 80 percent of the appraised value. mrp has a foreclosure discount for those who are current on the mortgage. with a separate legal entity they take the mortgage to say we pay later. then through the mrp refinance the mortgages through fha. but let me finish. through the program is determined later it was not free market value, the joint powers authori
of $160,000, sometimes more, and then talking about the tennessee for doctors then who just graduated to say how am i going to make this money? we have, you know, med p organization c, and -- med pac, and this is an issue you talked about in your testimony. in our country, we pay specialists a ratio more than primary care physicians than they do in other countries that do their health care very successfully and cheaper and less expensively than we do. one of the things about student loans, to me, there's nothing good about high costs of college and graduate school, in my mind, except that the only probably good thing is that if creates some tool for us to motivate people to go into the things that we need. the one question i'd like the panel to think about, an i know you have testimony and we'll have question, is what is a return on investment if we say to doctors, graduating medical school, will, doing some forgiveness, specialty forgiveness for being a primary physician in a rural area or underserved urban area, but what's the return on investment if we really, really encourage loan
. >> the senator from tennessee. >> thank you. >> i want to thank the chairman for holding this hearing. the way that paulson politics are in washington, sometimes it seems that we can't be happy for someone on the other side of the aisle and nothing could be further from the truth, and i would just like to say that i thought that senator kerry acquitted himself exceptionally well in the hearings that he had last week. i thought they were wide-ranging and i thought that he had the opportunity to display and anyone who has lived a life that has been touched by john kerry, i am happy for him and his family and the fact that he will be able to express himself. his dad was a foreign service officer and he certainly made a splash, some people thought it was negative, others positive, he certainly made a splash during the vietnam era and from that point on has been very active. again, i thought he acquitted himself exceptionally well. just because of some of the things that have happened in libya, we have a state department that needs oversight, and we haven't provided it. we are providing it now for
in only by further isolation of the international community. we continue polluters to tennessee for diplomacy, but actions like this undercut efforts of the international community to resolve concerns or is there clear opinion. >> the president recovery board arguably succeeded in stopping the recession if you will. >> the perab success is the administration and congress that help go for the recovery act, measure is to say say the mobile industry, they voted for measures to stem the crisis in the financial sector. there's no question of base from perab, from as they canceled that actions are taken by those in power to take this action, the president and congress. >> all except that. >> since it is created, unemployment has fallen only 1.1% seems excessive that? >> again come the president repeatedly talks about the need for us to do more, that we're not where you want to beat with economic growth and job creation. there's no? people would be employed have republicans start to surpass the american jobs act. it's a simple mathematical fact that he would be where teachers the class
and and a daschle process that never existed before. as they do at enormous oak ridge and tennessee but also an enormous facility out in hanford, washington, where plutonium will be processed for the atomic bomb that will be dropped on nagasaki. >> this is a process that bill knudsen sets in motion. through the, through the top prime contractors down to the subcontractors on through the rest of the american economy and industry that gets underway. by time of pearl harbor it's a wartime which is gone production which is gone from basically a standing start to approaching that of nazi germany. by the end of 9042 when the effort really gets rolling, by the end of 1942 when the effort really gets started with full conversion of the automobile industry, for example, over the wartime production, the united states is out producing all of the axis powers combined, and by the end of 1943, american economy is producing more war material and germany, ma the soviet union and great britain combined. ford motor company alone produces more than mussolini's economy as a whole. and, in fact, we produce enoug
: abraham manchester tennessee please go ahead with your question or comment for senator coburn. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. i heard a quote from you that began a fan of the jack welch principal in reverse for congress 90% of members every election only keep the 10%. my question to you, senator do you consider yourself 10% as productive in congress and can you elaborate on what specifically you done to help reduce our government deficit? >> guest: sure. i would be happy to. >> host: that quote is directly from the debt bomb. >> guest: it is. all you have to do is look at what my host has out in front of me. nobody in the senate or congress has done more oversight than i have of my staff. we have looked at more a areas of government. when i was a majority member and committee chair, we did more oversight in those two years in 2005 and 2006 than the rest of the entire senate in terms of looking at where the problems are. my contention is if the american people knew what i knew, you would fire 90% of us. you may even fired 100% of us but the fact is large amounts of your future a
in response to justice kennedy's question. in tennessee v. garner you have half the states that have abrogated the rule. in richards v. wisconsin, you have half the states that did not sport an exception the -- support an exception to the no knock rule. here we have half the states in the country that would not have permitted what went on in this case. thank you very much. >> thank you, counsel. mr. koester, we'll give you three minutes. >> thank you. everyone agrees that the closer a chemical test is taken to the time of driving, the more reliable the evidence of intoxication is, the more reliable the evidence of impairment is. so under the respondent's approach, it would be mandated that we're going to allow the most reliable evidence to dissipate and degrade over a period of time in favor of admittedly less reliable ed taken at a later -- evidence taken at a later time. and that's simply inconsistent with fourth amendment jurisprudence and other destruction of evidence cases. i believe the respondent's proposed rule here is completely impractical be unworkable -- and unworkable. if there ar
with tough programs. mayor ron littlefield of tennessee said in one of our round table in augusta, georgia. it's important that different regions learn and even borrow workable solutions from each other. question did b a bsh -- we can be a clearing house of good idea and share solutions that worked in other parts of the country. this helps avoid past mistakes, but it also provides solid evidence there is a solution that can work, and you can take to your councils and legislators and voters. it's important that the workable solutions get put on the table. we heard over and over and over again how in our round table and in our scholarly paper the need to find the right balance between business and government. we created the conservation leadership partnership to evaluate and education mother alternative and entrepreneurial based solutions that can entice everybody, conservatives, liberals, rastafarian, whoever can be here. but the shared goal of scef conserving our environment. at the hilton head round table we heard about how the challenges that state fish and wildlife agencies are having t
officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corker: thank you. i want to thank the chairman for holding the business meeting the way he held it today and the hearings last week for this confirmation. i know a lot of people think that because of the way partisan politics are here in washington that sometimes we can't be happy for someone on the other side of the aisle when they do well, and nothing could be further from the truth. i just want to say that i thought that senator kerry acquitted himself exceptionally well in the hearings we had last week. i thought they were wide-ranging, and i think he had the opportunity to display the depth of knowledge that he has on many issues. i don't know of anybody who's lived a life that has been more oriented towards ultimately being secretary of state than john kerry. and for that, i also am happy for him and his family and the fact that very soon he's going to be able to express himself on behalf of our nation in this way. i think most of you know his dad was a foreign service officer. i know that you know that he certainly made a splash -- som
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